A Little Truth

I used to promise myself that I would never have children. Secretly, keeping close all the hurts I felt as a child myself, certain that I had no light or joy to share. How could I bring a beautiful, innocent new life into a world from which I felt so estranged? How could I possibly … Continue reading A Little Truth

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A response to “Dear white friends: racism is slightly more complex than what you learned about in primary school” by Michelle Weber

A very well thought out response the the essay I reblogged previously. I strongly agree with so many points the author made in response to the original article. I especially agree that it was shameful and degrading how Dr. King and Rosa Parks were described. Dr. King is a hero of mine and it saddened … Continue reading A response to “Dear white friends: racism is slightly more complex than what you learned about in primary school” by Michelle Weber

Dear white friends: racism is slightly more complex than what you learned about in primary school

Beautifully written essay. I so want to do better, be better and do what the author suggests. It’s so easy to close our eyes to the atrocities of our past. What do you do today, when the perpetrators, the dispassionate, the indifferent and apathetic are living next door, or are your coworkers, or family? We can all do better.

Reclaiming My Time

After several years of banging my head against the wall upon seeing the old American proverbs of “it (racism) goes both ways” and “slavery ended 300 years ago” in social media comment sections, I think it’s time we address an uncomfortable truth: the watered down, Cliff Notes unit on racial inequality you were taught in elementary school was a lie. And now it is your responsibility to relinquish your outdated understanding of black and white race relations and investigate deeper.

What do Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., segregation, and slavery all have in common? They’re all talking points in social studies classes when the unit on racialized historical conflicts rolls around—and that’s if it ever does. We learn that the most important faces of the Civil Rights Movement were an exhausted seamstress who refused to give up her bus seat and a reverend who just wanted little black kids…

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